Face Masks make me feel lonely

Today Patty and I flew to Hawaii to see our youngest daughter Sally, her husband Aaron and our three grandkids that they parent. In fact I am writing this blog on the airplane. Over the last 40 years I have traveled to different countries and places on an airplane a lot. Airports and airplanes had become over the years one of my favorite places to talk to people about their life, their interests, and their faith. I said “had” because they aren’t any more because nobody talks, thanks to face masks. It is like everyone is walking around in their own little, bitty world all by themselves. Another one of my favorite activities was to walk around Home Depot, Sportsman’s Warehouse, Coastal Farm, and Harbor Freight looking at stuff and striking up conversations with other customers. I would go into at least one of those stores several times each week. I don’t do that anymore, it is a waste of time, unless I am there just to buy something, because it is just about impossible to have a conversation with anybody, nobody will talk, thanks to the power of the almighty face mask that is saving us all from death.

I wore a mask most of the day today because I would have gotten yelled at a lot had I not, and I don’t enjoy making a scene. It is a strange feeling being around people all day and feeling lonely, isolated, and like being in prison. People don’t even make eye contact with you anymore as you walk down the aisle of the airplane. No “Hi, how are you” coming from anybody.

From my research and reading I don’t think masks help with the spread of COVID at all, but even if they helped a little, I am of the very strong opinion that the price we are paying in people’s mental, psychological, and spiritual health is much greater than any benefit gained in physical health. There is a very real reason that suicides, alcohol consumption, drug use, and domestic violence have all increased substantially this past year. People were created by God for community, and for social interaction, and even the most introverted person will be unhappy without it.

People often say to me, “wearing a face mask is no different than wearing a bicycle helmet or a seat belt.” I wear a seat belt every time I ride in a car and a helmet every time I ride my bicycle, and my experience today in the world of face masks was much different than a day of traveling on my bicycle. I end a day riding my bike feeling happy, I ended today feeling depressed.

4 thoughts on “Face Masks make me feel lonely

  1. Kate

    I completely agree with this post and have been reading your posts for about 3 months or so. I find them very encouraging and I love your devotion to prayer! Thank you for being a light in this crazy world!

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    1. Vicki Caldwell

      Yes as the year has ended I finally told a coworker, I’m not liking all this isolation due to covid. And I like being alone! But this is not ok. The world needs to be happening around me and it’s not. It is getting lonely and depressing. I understand now when you teach us how God made us to be together.

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  2. Larry Richard Penner

    Dee. I have taken my dad to several medical offices in recent days. Because he is nearly deaf, but functions partially with a cochlear implant, the masks on the medical staff made it nearly impossible for him to hear and understand their instructions on post-surgery. Sitting way across the room they could not make an mask-removal-exception for him to hear important care instructions. The problem existed everywhere starting with receptionists and forms. To add to the problem he has had a sudden setback on close vision and reading those forms is very difficult right now.

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